Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Classics

Academics

Classics 266/366. Gender, Power and the Gods

An introduction to the study of the public and private lives of women in Mediterranean antiquity from classical Athens and Rome to late antiquity (fifth century B.C.E. to fourth century C.E.). The relationship of secular authority to religious custom in the Greco-Roman city-states and empires, and the social status of women within these cultures as understood (and misunderstood) by civic institutions and religious customs, including medicine, law, mythology, art and politics. Special attention to religious practices that allowed women more visible and powerful social identities, including state festivals, the so-called mystery cults, and the emerging Rabbinic (Jewish) and Christian traditions.